Centre de recherche interuniversitaire sur la formation et la profession enseignante (CRIFPE)

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Publication

O'Keeffe-Foley, J. (2918). Improving Professional Development : A Mixed-Methods Study of Teacher Motivation Through Intrinsic and Extrinsic Factors. Thèse de doctorat inédite, The School of Education of Manhattanville College, New York, New York.

Résumé

Research has suggested PD as a way of enhancing teacher instruction. Although research has shown that many factors improve its effectiveness, the role of teacher motivation has not been thoroughly assessed. If PD is to have its intended impact, then school leaders need to address it when planning. Using Herzberg’s (1959) two-factor theory, this study set out to determine which factors, intrinsic and extrinsic, increased teacher engagement and disengagement, respectively, and how well school leaders address them. The findings showed the following for the role of intrinsic factors: (a) professional growth and the PD work itself including relevance to the classroom, presentation quality/presenter credibility, collaboration with colleagues, and choice are highly significant and school leaders are mostly planning for them; (b) autonomy over their own PD work is highly significant although school leaders are not planning explicitly for it; (c) recognition is significant although school leaders are not planning explicitly for it; and (d) although important, PD achievement is not the greatest motivator nor are school leaders effectively planning for it. The findings showed the following for the role of the extrinsic factors in teachers’ disengagement during PD: (a) lack of organization and management including work already known/repetitive work and work that is irrelevant to the classroom—an intrinsic factor—are dominant; however, school leaders are mostly attending to these; (b) poor working conditions including poor timing/too long, other work demands, and tired are significant; however, the findings were inconclusive for how school leaders were attending to them; (c) disruption to personal life, inadequate physical space, 2 negative relationships with supervisors, negative relationships with colleagues, and lack of compensation are not as significant; however, although some improvements need to be made, school leaders are attending to them; and (d) although school leaders are attending to it, lack of security was ruled out as significant.

Lien

https://pqdtopen.proquest.com/doc/2309521669.html?FMT=AI&pubnum=27540180
Logos des universités associées au CRIFPE

Adresse civique

Université de Montréal
Faculté des Sciences de l'Éducation
CRIFPE
90, avenue Vincent d'Indy
Pavillon Marie-Victorin – C-536
Outremont (Québec) H2V 2S9

Adresse postale

Université de Montréal
Faculté des Sciences de l'Éducation
CRIFPE – C-543
C.P. 6128, succursale Centre-ville
Montréal (Québec) H3C 3J7